Latest Headlines

Brown and Allison use crowdsourcing to evaluate published scientific literature

Systematically evaluating scientific literature is a time-consuming endeavor that requires hours of coding and rating. Andrew W. Brown, PhD, scientist in the Office of Energetics—in collaboration with David B. Allison, PhD, director of the Nutrition Obesity Research Center (NORC)—recently described a method to distribute these tasks across a large group through online crowdsourcing.

Liu and fellow researchers assess the effects of genes using the sequence kernel association test

Traditional genome-wide association studies (GWASs) usually focus on single-marker analysis, which only accesses marginal effects. Pathway analysis, on the other hand, considers biological pathway-gene-marker hierarchical structure and, therefore, provides additional insights into the genetic architecture underlining complex diseases. Recently, a number of methods for pathway analysis have been proposed to assess the significance of a biological pathway from a collection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms. In a study led by Nianjun Liu, PhD, associate professor in the Department of Biostatistics, Section on Statistical Genetics, a novel approach for pathway analysis was put forth that assesses the effects of genes using the sequence kernel association test and the effects of pathways using an extended adaptive rank truncated product statistic.

Allison is elected Fellow of New York Academy of Medicine

David B. Allison, PhD, director of both the Office of Energetics and National Institutes of Health-funded Nutrition Obesity Research Center (NORC), has been elected a Fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine (NYAM), which addresses the health challenges facing the world's urban populations through interdisciplinary approaches to innovative research, policy leadership, evaluation, education, and community engagement.

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BST News

Brown and Allison use crowdsourcing to evaluate published scientific literature

Systematically evaluating scientific literature is a time-consuming endeavor that requires hours of coding and rating. Andrew W. Brown, PhD, scientist in the Office of Energetics—in collaboration with David B. Allison, PhD, director of the Nutrition Obesity Research Center (NORC)—recently described a method to distribute these tasks across a large group through online crowdsourcing.

Liu and fellow researchers assess the effects of genes using the sequence kernel association test

Traditional genome-wide association studies (GWASs) usually focus on single-marker analysis, which only accesses marginal effects. Pathway analysis, on the other hand, considers biological pathway-gene-marker hierarchical structure and, therefore, provides additional insights into the genetic architecture underlining complex diseases. Recently, a number of methods for pathway analysis have been proposed to assess the significance of a biological pathway from a collection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms. In a study led by Nianjun Liu, PhD, associate professor in the Department of Biostatistics, Section on Statistical Genetics, a novel approach for pathway analysis was put forth that assesses the effects of genes using the sequence kernel association test and the effects of pathways using an extended adaptive rank truncated product statistic.

Allison is elected Fellow of New York Academy of Medicine

David B. Allison, PhD, director of both the Office of Energetics and National Institutes of Health-funded Nutrition Obesity Research Center (NORC), has been elected a Fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine (NYAM), which addresses the health challenges facing the world's urban populations through interdisciplinary approaches to innovative research, policy leadership, evaluation, education, and community engagement.

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EHS News

Gohlke wins new investigator award for research into birth defects

Julia Gohlke, Ph.D., was named the 2014 recipient of the F. Clarke Fraser New Investigator Award from The Teratology Society, which promotes cutting-edge research on birth defects and other developmental disorders.

Maples earns AIHA John Palassis Memorial Award

Elizabeth H. Maples, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences and deputy director of the Deep South Center for Occupational Health & Safety, was recently honored at the AIHce 2014 conference with the John Palassis Memorial Award, which is named for a former American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA) member who produced significant impact in the field of industrial hygiene through worker training, outreach to small businesses, and the development of consistent and comprehensive safety and health program standards.
 

Doke and Gohlke investigate health risks linked to fish consumption in Ghana

Fish is an important source of nutrition in the West Africa nation of Ghana, little is known about the possible health effects associated with metal concentrations found in fish. Therefore, PhD candidate Dzigbodi Adzo Doke, MS, and assistant professor Julia M. Gohlke, PhD, in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences, aimed to estimate metal concentrations in fishery resources so as to inform guidelines on fish consumption in the country.

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EPI News

Epigenome-wide association study conducted by Irvin and team

Genetic research regarding blood lipids has largely focused on DNA sequence variation; few studies have explored epigenetic effects. Genome-wide surveys of DNA methylation may uncover epigenetic factors influencing lipid metabolism. To identify whether differential methylation of cytosine-guanine dinucleotides (CpGs) correlated with lipid phenotypes, M. Ryan Irvin, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Epidemiology, recently isolated DNA from CD4+ T-cells and quantified proportion of sample methylation at over 450,000 CpGs, using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 Beadchip in 991 participants of the Genetics of Lipid Lowering Drugs and Diet Network (GOLDN).

Johnson and colleagues assess HPV in women in Nepal

Nepal has one of the highest cervical cancer rates in South Asia. Only a few studies in populations from urban areas have investigated type specific distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) in Nepali women, since data on high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) types are not currently available for rural populations in Nepal. Derek C. Johnson, MPH, graduate assistant in the Department of Epidemiology, aimed to assess the distribution of HR- HPV among rural Nepali women while assessing self-collected and clinician-collected cervico-vaginal specimens as sample collection methods for HPV screening.

Moore and colleagues examine the epidemiology of firework-related injuries among youths

Justin X. Moore, MPH, doctoral candidate in the Department of Epidemiology—along with department colleagues professor and vice chair Gerald McGwin, Jr., PhD, and assistant professor Russell L. Griffin, PhD—recently examined the epidemiology of firework-related injuries among an emergency department (ED) nationally representative population for the years 2000-2010, including whether the type of firework causing the injury is differential by patient demographics and whether the severity of injury is associated with the firework type.

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HB News

Dhurandhar and team discover that eating or skipping breakfast has no impact on weight loss

In observational studies, breakfast is associated with lower body weight; therefore, public health authorities commonly recommend breakfast consumption to reduce obesity. The effectiveness of adopting these recommendations for reducing body weight is unknown, so Emily J. Dhurandhar, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Health Behavior, tested the relative effectiveness of a recommendation to eat or skip breakfast on weight loss in adults trying to lose weight in a free-living setting.

No evidence eating breakfast promotes weight-loss

Nutritionists regularly suggest you eat breakfast each morning for its health benefits, including weight-loss and maintenance. But new research led by UAB shows that — whether you regularly consume it or skip it altogether — weight-loss is not influenced.

Three professors awarded emeritus rank

Connie L. Kohler, Dr.P.H., was named professor emerita in the UAB Department of Health Behavior. Her research spanned several health fields,including asthma, tobacco-use cessation and diabetes.

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HCOP News

Tajeu and Menachemi investigate association between hospital quality and patient satisfaction

Hospital incentive payments are increasingly becoming tied to quality. However, the U.S. health care system continues to face rising health care costs and scarce workforce resources, making improving quality a challenge. Patient satisfaction and process quality are two areas of quality tied to reimbursement—and are associated with positive health outcomes.

Pair of new studies aims to improve maternal and child health in Kenya

HIV has been transformed into a chronic, manageable disease for most people living with HIV in the United States, where mother-to-child transmission of HIV is now a rare occurrence. But in sub-Saharan Africa, new HIV infections in children, and maternal deaths due to HIV, are still major problems. Two new studies from the University of Alabama at Birmingham aim to change that.

Recent public health graduate receives national dissertation award

Alva Ferdinand, Dr.P.H., who earned her doctorate from the University of Alabama at Birmingham Department of Health Care Organization and Policy in December 2013 and immediately landed a tenure-track position at Texas A&M University, has received the AcademyHealth 2014 “Outstanding Dissertation Award.”

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Upcoming Events

Summer Internship Poster Session
Friday, August 1, 2014 - 12:00pm
Obesity Alters Anti-tumor Immunity
Tuesday, August 5, 2014 - 12:00pm
BST Lecture Series: Suzanne E. Judd, PhD
Wednesday, August 20, 2014 - 11:00am
2014 ALUMNUS AWARD FOR SCIENTIFIC EXCELLENCE
Friday, September 5, 2014 - 11:00am
Thirteenth Annual Janet L. Norwood Award
Wednesday, September 10, 2014 - 9:30am
Open Houses FALL 2014
Friday, September 19, 2014 - 9:00am
Professional Series: Writing Successful NSF Grants
Friday, September 19, 2014 - 11:00am

Our Open House provides a wonderful opportunity to tour our campus, speak with faculty and learn more about what UAB School of Public Health has to offer you. On the dates below, you can:

  • Meet faculty to learn more about our degrees, which represent more than 100 different career areas.
  • Tour our labs and classrooms.
  • Attend a session to find out what career areas are a match to your interests and abilities.


Please visit our Admissions Events Page for a list of Open House dates and other opportunities to learn more about our programs.

Click Links Below to Register for an Departmental Open House
 

Biostatistics
 

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Health Behavior
 

Health Care Organization