Epidemiology Courses (EPI)

Epidemiology Course Catalog 2012-2013

(*) Indicates the course may be taken more than once for credit.

EPI 600. Introduction to Epidemiology.-Principles of epidemiologic thinking. Measures of disease frequency and association. Determinants of disease and distribution of factors influencing health and disease in populations. Epidemiology of diseases of public health importance today. Core requirement for Non-Epidemiology MPH majors. 3 hours. Fall (Thomas)
 
EPI 601. Vaccinology. - Introduction to the principles underlying disease control and prevention using vaccines.  Review of major vaccine-preventable diseases as well as modern vaccine research endeavors. Prerequisites: Clinical doctoral degree (MD, DDS, DVM, DSN, or other similar degrees with approval); or completion of 15 or more credits of master’s or doctoral level EPI courses; or permission of instructor.
3 hours. Fall (Edgar Turner Overton).
 
EPI 602. Epidemiology of Chronic Diseases. - Application of epidemiologic principles to assess the causes of cancer, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and other chronic diseases. Emphasis on biological basis, rates, association, etiology, prevention, and control. Pertinent literature critically reviewed. Prerequisites: EPI 600 or EPI 610. 3 hours. Course offered every odd calendar year in the Spring.
 
EPI 603. Injury-Epidemiologic Principles and Prevention Strategies.-Concepts and methods of epidemiology applied to injury; epidemiology of major injury types, utilization of injury data sets; development and evaluation techniques of preventive strategies. Prerequisite: EPI 600 or EPI 610 recommended but not required. 3 hours. Spring (Waterbor)
 
EPI 604. Infectious Disease Control and Surveillance.- This course is a Study Abroad Opportunity offered jointly by the Department of Epidemiology and the Sparkman Center for Global Health at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) School of Public Health, the Department of Community Health and Psychiatry at the University of the West Indies (UWI), the Graduate School of Public Health at the San Diego State University (SDSU), and the Jamaican Ministry of Health (MJoH). At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to discuss research design, methods and techniques, describe and explain multi-factorial approaches to disease surveillance and control, integrate the major disciplines in public health in the context of disease control in Jamaica, and generate and analyze primary field and community based data and prepare electronic presentations of their findings. Course will be graded by letter. Prerequisites: Designed for master’s students interested in epidemiology and international health. Advanced undergraduate students with a strong background in biology and/or ecology may enroll with permission of instructor. 3 hours. Summer (Wilson)
 
EPI 605. Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases.- Introduction to basic principles of infectious disease epidemiology, surveillance, and control. This course will also include critical analysis of the magnitude, distribution, risk factors, and public health significance of selected infectious diseases in community and institutional settings. While the primary geographic focus is the U.S., international comparisons and perspectives will be offered.  Primary attention is neither on research methods nor on clinical and pathologic aspects of disease. Prerequisites: EPI 600, EPI 610 or an equivalent introductory epidemiology course or permission of instructor. 3 hours. Spring (Chamot)
 
EPI 606/706. The Epidemiology of Cardiovascular Disease.- Exploration of the breadth and depth of the epidemiology of cardiovascular disease including history, classification, surveillance, frequency, distribution, etiology, natural history, and control.  This course addresses the programmatic details of large-scale epidemiologic studies in cardiovascular disease and the review and critical evaluation of epidemiological evidence on the major risk factors for heart disease and stroke. Primarily a lecture course including guest presentations by experts on selected topics. Prerequisite: EPI 610 or permission of instructor. 2 hours. Course offered every even calendar year in the Summer (Howard).
 
EPI 607. Fundamentals of Clinical Research.- This course will provide an overview of principles and practices related to the study of determinants and outcomes of medical interventions. Methods for conducting epidemiologic research in the "clinic", assessing the validity of diagnostic and screening tests, measuring therapeutic efficacy and safety, and describing the natural history of disease will be reviewed. Prerequisite: Introductory training in epidemiology (e.g., EPI 600 or EPI 610) is recommended but not required.
3 hours. Fall (Glasser)
 
EPI 608. Tropical Infectious Diseases.-Overview of infectious diseases important in tropical countries, including traditional parasitic diseases (e.g., helminthic and protozoal infections), as well as selected viral and bacterial infections. The agent, fundamentals of clinical course and pathogenesis, mode of transmission, geographic distribution, descriptive epidemiology, and principal methods of prevention and treatment are covered for each disease. Prerequisite: Strong Biology background, contact instructor to discuss. 3 hours. Spring (Jolly)
 
EPI 609. Pharmacoepidemiology & Comparative Effectiveness Research.- This course is open to graduate students registered in the masters or doctoral program at the UAB School of Public Health and residents and fellows in the School of Medicine, and it may also be of interest to students from graduate health-related programs outside the UAB School of Public Health. The course provides an overview of epidemiologic methods applied to the study of utilization and safety of drugs in large numbers of individuals and an overview of issues and methods used in comparative effectiveness research on drugs, other medical interventions and medical care delivery. Lecturers will present examples of methodological problems and studies based on ongoing research at UAB. 3 hours. Fall (Delzell)
 
EPI 610. Principles of Epidemiologic Research.-Concepts and methods of epidemiology.  Measures of disease frequency, association and impact; study design and analysis, indices of disease and health; overview of major categories of acute and chronic disease, analysis of epidemiologic data sets.  Track requirement for EPI majors. Co- requisite: EPI 610L (computer laboratory course) must be taken with EPI 610. 4 hours. Fall (McGwin)
 
EPI 610L. Principles of Epidemiologic Research-Lab.-Epidemiologic research lab. Co-requisite: Lab must be taken concurrently with EPI 610. 0 hours. Fall (McGwin)
  
EPI 612/712. Nutritional Epidemiology.-Nutritional epidemiology will cover core concepts in human nutrition including nutrient classification, nutrient sources, nutritional deficiencies, nutritional excesses, recommended daily allowances, basic anthropometry, dietary assessment methods in free-living populations, validation of dietary assessment methods, identification of biomarkers of dietary intake, study designs used in nutritional epidemiology, issues in the analysis and presentation of dietary data, diet-disease associations, gene-diet associations and special topics in nutrition (e.g., folic acid and neural tube defects, fatty acids and the metabolic syndrome, diet and obesity, vitamin A and immune function, vitamins and mother-to-child transmission of HIV, etc). 3 hours. Course offered every even calendar year in the Spring.
 
EPI 613/713. Cancer Epidemiology and Control.- This course will address methodology and substantive issues in cancer epidemiology. Content will include definitions, biological origins and pathological and clinical aspects of cancer; an introduction to information sources and methods in cancer epidemiology; the global burden of cancer; descriptive epidemiology and major risk factors for various forms of cancer; strategies for cancer prevention and the role of epidemiology developing and evaluating those strategies. Prerequisite:Completion of an introductory Epidemiology course (EPI 600, EPI 610, or equivalent). Permission of instructor for students in other programs and schools. 3 hours. Summer (Waterbor)
 
EPI 614. Epidemiologic Methods Applied to Comparative Effectiveness Research.- This course will focus on methodological issues pertaining to the design, analysis and interpretation of comparative effectiveness research studies. Special focus will be placed on comparative effectiveness research studies using a non-experimental design and large data base analyses. 2 hours. Spring (Muntner)
 
EPI 615. Ecology and Epidemiology of Arthropod-Borne Diseases.-A course in infectious disease epidemiology. The topic is the epidemiology and control of arthropod-borne diseases. Prerequisites: Previous course or background in general infectious disease epidemiology, and background in biology or microbiology are desirable. Contact course master for guidance if you wish to enroll but are unsure that you are qualified.
3 hours. Spring
 
EPI 616. Environmental Epidemiology.-Design and conduct of studies examining health effects of environmental exposures.  Strengths and limitations of research strategies and interpretation of study results. Areas of interest include air and water pollution, lead, and biological marker outcomes. Prerequisite: EPI 600 or EPI 610. 3 hours. Summer (Sathiakumar)
 
EPI 617. Occupational Epidemiology.-Epidemiologic methods used in investigation of health effects of occupational exposures; review and critical evaluation of epidemiologic evidence pertaining to effects of selected occupational exposures on human health. Lectures and guest presentations by experts on selected topics. Prerequisite: EPI 610, EPI 610L. 3 hours.
 
EPI 618. Fieldwork in Public Health.- Application of public health principles in the communicable disease control and environmental health programs carried out at Jefferson County Department of Health. Prerequisites: EPI 610, EPI610L, and EPI 605 or Permission of instructor. Pass/No Pass. 2 hours. Summer (Arnett)
 
EPI 621/721. HIV/AIDS and STD's.-Basic biology and pathogenesis, historical and current trends, domestic and international epidemiology, determinants of spread, immunogenetics and host susceptibility, options for prevention, surveillance and control of sexually transmitted diseases (STD's) and HIV/AIDS. Prerequisite: Clinical doctoral degree (MD, DDS, DVM, DSN, or other similar degrees with approval); or be at least a second year masters student, or permission of instructor. 3 hours. Fall (Jolly)
 
EPI 623. Introduction to the SAS Software.-An introduction and overview of the SAS software including navigating the various components of the software, importing and exporting data sets, simple programming to clean and query data sets or create subsets of data. This course does not require or include statistical analyses. Students are required to have a computer with the SAS software installed and have knowledge of the basic functions in the Windows operating system. Prerequisites: None. This course is open to both masters and doctoral students and the course is assigned a letter grade. 1 hour.
 
EPI 624/724. Grant Applications in an International Setting.-Students will be expected to write all the sections of a grant proposal with an international focus (as could be submitted to the National Institute of Health or any other recognized funding agency pre-approved by the instructor). The course will offer both didactic (lectures) and hands-on (group work) learning activities. The lectures will provide basic guidelines for completion of the assignments. The hands-on learning format will focus on reviewing assignments and providing feedback on fellow students' work. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. 3 hours.
 
EPI 625. Quantitative Methods in Epidemiology.-An introduction to multivariate techniques and survival analysis as they pertain to epidemiologic data and critical reading of corresponding literature, specifically, logistic regression, log-linear modeling, Poisson regression, life tables, Kaplan-Meier survival curves, and Cox proportional hazards modeling. Track requirement for EPI majors. Prerequisites: BST 612 and EPI 611. 3 hours. Summer May Mini-Term (Funkhouser)
 
EPI 626. Introduction to Data Analysis with SAS.-The general content will be basic SAS programming focused on fundamental statistical procedures.  Upon completion of the course, the student should be able to do simple analysis and programming when given a SAS data set, and complete exercises from more advanced classes in epidemiology and biostatistics.1 hour. Spring
 
EPI 627. Data Analysis and Presentation of Epidemiologic Studies.-The students will analyze data from an epidemiologic study, addressing a specific question, and prepare a manuscript from their analysis.  There are 3 possibilities regarding choice of data: 1) from a list of the instructor's datasets, 2) public use data, 3) from the student's research. Students working on an MSPH or another degree project may use data for that degree-project with approval of their advisor and course master.  Upon completion of the course, the student should be able to analyze data from an epidemiologic study and prepare a manuscript. Prerequisites: BST 612, EPI 611, EPI 625 and BST 626 or EPI 626. 3 hours. Fall. (Funkhouser)
 
EPI 630. Data Analyses Using EPI Info.-Provides practical training in Epi Info and related software packages (SSS1, Logistic, Epi Map) developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Hands-on exercises include: using statistical programs; developing questionnaires and data entry; data editing; analyses of data sets encompassing major study designs; and report writing. Also reviews important epidemiological and statistical principles in context of data analyses. Prerequisites: BST 612 and EPI 610. 3 hours.
 
EPI 632. Molecular and Genetic Basis of Obesity.- This course focuses on the physiological factors underlying obesity as well as the genetic basis of body size regulation and feeding behavior. The course includes an overview of nutritional biochemistry and metabolism, as well as the development of co-morbidities associated with obesity. Course topics include energy balance, adipose tissue development, gene structure and function, basic genetic principles, satiety signaling, animal models of obesity, treatments for obesity, and obesity as it relates to diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor; intro to Biological Sciences in Public Health and/or undergraduate courses in Biochemistry or Biology preferred. 3 hours. Spring. (Bray)
 
EPI 635. Genetics in Public Health.- This course will provide a topical overview of issues in public health genetics. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the complex issues involved in applying and integrating genetic technology and information into public health. Through a series of lectures, students will learn about the history of public health genetics, the role that genetics play in public health, and issues involved in applying genetic technology in clinical and research settings. Lectures will also address the ethical, legal, and social implications of genetic testing in populations and research designed to identify susceptibility genes in diverse ethnic and racial groups. Prerequisites: Currently enrolled in a Master’s program. Undergraduates will need permission of instructor. 2 hours. Course offered every even calendar year during the Spring. (Shrestha)
 
EPI 650. Global Perspectives on Disease Prevention and Control.-This course is designed to introduce and/or enhance the fundamental grasp of public health principles in disease control, management, and surveillance for practitioners, teachers, and students of public health in developing countries. EPI 650 will be graded by letter. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Prior exposure to the discipline of public health is required. This course is not suitable for the student entering the discipline for the first time, due to its intense nature, but may be suitable for selected first year students who have prior international and/or public health experience. 6 hours. Course offered every even calendar year during the Summer. (Wilson)
 
EPI 680. Topics in Clinical Research.-Provide health sciences professionals interested in clinical trials, clinical epidemiology, and other forms of population research with both essential principles and specific technical knowledge in a variety of areas relevant to the conduct of biological and behavioral investigation of human subjects.  Prerequisite: Limited to health professionals planning clinical research careers who have been accepted into the MSPH in Clinical Research Program. 2 hours. Irregular course that starts in January and ends in June. Register for this course during the Summer term. (McGwin)
 
EPI 681. Special Topics in Epidemiology.- Discussion of infectious disease research and practice encompassing design, conduct, analysis, and interpretation. Students participate in supervised research and/or in research design. Prerequisite: EPI 605 and permission of instructor for enrolling in EPI 681, and permission of instructor for enrolling in EPI 781. 3 hours 
 
EPI 682. Gorgas Course in Tropical Medicine. Hands-on exposure to tropical diseases and emerging pathogens in various teaching formats: didactic lectures, roundtables, laboratory work, clinical and hospital rounds, case conferences, computer training, field trips and independent study. Course is held in the Spring Term in Lima, Peru. 9 hours (3 or 6 hours are also accepted with evaluation restricted to selected sections of the course). Spring (Freedman)
 
*EPI 695/795. Epidemiology Seminar Series. This lectureship series is a forum for scientific dialogue on current topics in epidemiology, biostatistics and public health. The course will promote the development of knowledge about epidemiology methods, analytic approaches, disease etiology as well as natural history and current issues related to the application of these concepts to conducting epidemiologic research and public health practice. Pass/No Pass. 1 hour. Fall and Spring (Arnett)
 
EPI 696. Master’s Epidemiology Seminar.-Critical evaluation of selected epidemiologic papers from published literature. Consideration of composition, study design, and validity of analysis. Editorial review and disposition of manuscripts. Prerequisites: EPI 610 and EPI 611. 3 hours
 
EPI 697. Internship.-Field experience under joint direction of appropriate public health faculty member and qualified specialists working in selected aspects of public health. Pass/No Pass. 3 hours  (240 contact hours required). Fall, Spring, Summer
 
*EPI 698. Master's Directed Research, Epidemiology.-Independent study with guidance of appropriate public health faculty. Pass/No Pass. 1 - 9 hours. Fall, Spring, Summer
 
*EPI 699. Project Research, Epidemiology. - Research for project under direction of research committee. Pass/No Pass.1 - 9 hours. Fall, Spring, Summer
 
EPI 701. Advanced Readings in International Health.-Methodologically oriented course highlighting major findings in infectious disease control and prevention.  Many highlights from the HIV/STD field in developing countries, emphasizing recent advances. Number of credit hours enrolled depends on the magnitude of the research paper or proposal that is developed. 1-3 hours
 
EPI 702. Doctoral Seminar in International Health.-Seminar for student presentations of critiques of journal articles relevant to public health. Students will also present their dissertation research for peer review. Faculty presentations will focus on methods/topics of interest to all students. 1 hour
 
EPI 703. Grant Proposal Writing.-To provide the student with information about grant proposal writing and practice in preparing a grant proposal for submission.  The proposal must relate to an epidemiologic topic.  Human subject issues are discussed. Prerequisite: Must be a doctoral student or with permission of instructor. 3 hours. Course offered every even calendar year in the Summer (Arnett)
 
EPI 706/606. The Epidemiology of Cardiovascular Disease.- Exploration of the breadth and depth of the epidemiology of cardiovascular disease including history, classification, surveillance, frequency, distribution, etiology, natural history, and control.  This course addresses the programmatic details of large-scale epidemiologic studies in cardiovascular disease and the review and critical evaluation of epidemiological evidence on the major risk factors for heart disease and stroke. Primarily a lecture course including guest presentations by experts on selected topics. Prerequisite: EPI 610 or permission of instructor. 2 hours. Course offered every even calendar year in the Summer (Howard)
 
EPI 708/608. Tropical Infectious Diseases.-Overview of infectious diseases important in tropical countries, including traditional parasitic diseases (e.g., helminthic and protozoal infections), as well as selected viral and bacterial infections. The agent, fundamentals of clinical course and pathogenesis, mode of transmission, geographic distribution, descriptive epidemiology, and principal methods of prevention and treatment are covered for each disease. Prerequisite: Strong Biology background, contact instructor to discuss. 3 hours. Spring (Jolly)
 
EPI 709. Theoretical Basis of Epidemiology.-This course is designed to complement the notions introduced in EPI 625 (Quantitative Methods in Epidemiology), EPI 710 (The Analysis of Case-Control Studies), and EPI 720 (The Analysis of Follow-up Studies). EPI 709 will provide doctoral students with the theoretical basis underlying key aspects of the design, analysis and interpretation of epidemiologic studies. The course is intended to provide sufficient depth and sophistication in coverage of statistical material as to prepare for independence in epidemiologic research. This aim will be achieved, in part, through the review and discussion of landmark papers that introduced important conceptual and methodological advances in the discipline of epidemiology. The course will cover the following topics in depth: relations among measures of disease frequency, measures of potential impact, confounding and effect modification, matching, statistical inference in epidemiology, and estimation of key epidemiologic parameters. Prerequisites: BST 612 and EPI 625, or permission of instructor. 3 hours. Course offered every odd calendar year in the Fall (Chamot)
 
EPI 710. The Analysis of Case-Control Studies.-This course is designed to provide doctoral students in epidemiology with practical experience in the analysis and interpretation of data from case-control studies.  Specific aims are: To outline a strategy for data analysis and review relevant methodologic issues and to apply stratified analysis methods and regression models in the study of diseases of multifactorial etiology. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. 3 hours. Spring (McGwin)
 
EPI 712/612. Nutritional Epidemiology.-Nutritional epidemiology will cover core concepts in human nutrition including nutrient classification, nutrient sources, nutritional deficiencies, nutritional excesses, recommended daily allowances, basic anthropometry, dietary assessment methods in free-living populations, validation of dietary assessment methods, identification of biomarkers of dietary intake, study designs used in nutritional epidemiology, issues in the analysis and presentation of dietary data, diet-disease associations, gene-diet associations and special topics in nutrition (e.g., folic acid and neural tube defects, fatty acids and the metabolic syndrome, diet and obesity, vitamin A and immune function, vitamins and mother-to-child transmission of HIV, etc). 3 hours. Course offered every even calendar year during the Spring.
 
EPI 713/613. Cancer Epidemiology and Control.- This course will address methodology and substantive issues in cancer epidemiology. Content will include definitions, biological origins and pathological and clinical aspects of cancer; an introduction to information sources and methods in cancer epidemiology; the global burden of cancer; descriptive epidemiology and major risk factors for various forms of cancer; strategies for cancer prevention and the role of epidemiology developing and evaluating those strategies. Prerequisite:Doctoral student status in any Public Health discipline. Permission of instructor for students in other programs and schools. 3 hours. Summer (Waterbor)
 
EPI 715. Ecology and Epidemiology of Arthropod-Borne Diseases.-A course in infectious disease epidemiology. The topic is the epidemiology and control of arthropod-borne diseases. Prerequisites: Previous course or background in general infectious disease epidemiology, and background in biology or microbiology are desirable. Contact course master for guidance if you wish to enroll but are unsure that you are qualified. 3 hours. Spring (Novak)
 
EPI 720. The Analysis of Follow-up Studies.-Designed to provide doctoral students in epidemiology with practical experience in the analysis and interpretation of data from follow-up studies.  Specific aims are: to outline a strategy for data analysis and review relevant methodologic issues and to apply stratified analysis methods and regression models in the study of diseases of multifactorial etiology. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. 3 hours. Fall (Levitan)
 
EPI 721/621. HIV/AIDS and STD's.-Basic biology and pathogenesis, historical and current trends, domestic and international epidemiology, determinants of spread, immunogenetics and host susceptibility, options for prevention, surveillance and control of sexually transmitted diseases (STD's) and HIV/AIDS. Doctoral students will be responsible for writing a critical review paper or a grant application based on a STD/HIV topic of significant public health importance. Prerequisite: Clinical doctoral degree (MD, DDS, DVM, DSN, or other similar degrees with approval); or be at least a second year masters student, or permission of instructor. 3 hours. Fall (Jolly)
 
EPI 724/624. Grant Applications in an International Setting.-Students will be expected to write all the sections of a grant proposal with an international focus (as could be submitted to the National Institute of Health or any other recognized funding agency pre-approved by the instructor).  The course will offer both didactic (lectures) and hands-on (group work) learning activities. The lectures will provide basic guidelines for completion of the assignments. The hands-on learning format will focus on reviewing assignments and providing feedback on fellow students' work. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. 3 hours.
 
EPI 730. Introduction to Human Population Genetics Theory.-Basic concepts, theory and mathematical principles underlying population genetics, i.e., mechanisms affecting distribution of genes in populations. Prerequisites: Background in genetics, algebra, and statistics; or permission of instructor. 3 hours
 
EPI 731. Genetic Epidemiology.-This course will cover core concepts of designs, methods and statistical tools in genetic epidemiology studies for determining the contribution of genes to disease risk. Methods for incorporating genetic markers into conventional epidemiologic study designs as risk factors including genetic risk models, familial correlations, migration and admixture, quantitative and qualitative traits, association and linkage analyses in family based designs, allele/haplotype frequency estimation, Hardy Weinberg Equilibrium and linkage disequilibrium and application in both family and population based studies will be discussed. Methods for gene-gene and gene-environment interaction assessment, genome wide association studies are also presented. Prerequisites: College level genetics course; basic biostatistics (BST 600 or BST 611 or BST 621 or equivalent); and basic epidemiology (EPI 600 or EPI 610 or equivalent).  Students not meeting these pre-requisites may enroll only with the permission of the instructor. 4 hours. Course offered every odd calendar year during the Spring (Shrestha)
 
EPI 731L. Genetic Epidemiology-Lab.-Genetic EPI lab. Co-requisite: Lab must be taken concurrently with EPI 731. 0 hours. Spring (Shrestha)
 
EPI 781. Special Topics in Epidemiology. Discussion of infectious disease research and practice encompassing design, conduct, analysis, and interpretation. Students participate in supervised research and/or in research design. Prerequisite: EPI 605 and permission of instructor for enrolling in EPI 681, and permission of instructor for enrolling in EPI 781. 3 hours 
 
EPI 788. Principles and Methods in Molecular Epidemiology.- Molecular biology and its relevance to the epidemiology, etiology and natural history of human diseases. The course will develop knowledge and skills in molecular biology, genetics and epidemiology methods, and facilitate the application of this information to evaluate susceptibility, etiology, natural history, treatment, and prevention of diseases. 4 hours. Summer (Brown)
 
*EPI 790. Doctoral Seminar in Epidemiology.-In depth study and discussion of several areas of epidemiologic methodology not covered in other courses.  Students are responsible for selecting and presenting topics.  Considerable reading and outside preparation required.  Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Pass/No Pass. 2 hours. Fall and Summer.
 
EPI 793. DrPH Practicum.-. Field experience practicum which bridges professional academic preparation and advanced public health practice. Pass/No Pass. Fall, Spring, Summer. 6 hours (480 contact hours required).
 
*EPI 795/695. Epidemiology Seminar Series. This lectureship series is a forum for scientific dialogue on current topics in epidemiology, biostatistics and public health. The course will promote the development of knowledge about epidemiology methods, analytic approaches, disease etiology as well as natural history and current issues related to the application of these concepts to conducting epidemiologic research and public health practice. Pass/No Pass. 1 hour. Fall and Spring (Arnett)
 
*EPI 798. Doctoral Directed Research, Epidemiology.-Independent study with guidance of appropriate faculty. Pass/No Pass. Fall, Spring, Summer. 1 - 9 hours
 
*EPI 799. Dissertation Research, Epidemiology. - Research for dissertation under direction of dissertation committee. Pass/No Pass. Fall, Spring, Summer. 1 - 9 hours