Health Care Organization and Policy Courses (HCO)

Catalog 2017~2018

HCO 600. Introduction to Public Health Systems and Population-Based Health Programs- This course presents selected information, concepts, and methods from the field of public health.  Topics concerning the structure, financing and current status of the US health care system, as well as the history, organization, financing, and services of the public health system are discussed.  All topics are presented from a population-based perspective. 3 hours (Wingate)
 
HCO 601/701. Health Economics- Economics as systematic way of thinking about use of resources.  Tools of economics applied to issues of organization, delivery, financing, and outcome of health care.  Develops economic principles and describes system of health care financing and delivery in the United States, providing basis for analyzing health management and policy options. With didactic coursework provided in HCO 601, doctoral students prepare a major paper under instructor's direction. 3 hours (Sen, Becker, Mennemeyer)
 
HCO 605. Fundamentals of Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Part I: Issues, Programs, and Policies- Provides students with knowledge about current MCH health, social, economic, and environmental issues; programs and policies for women of reproductive age, infants, and children. Required for the MPH degree in the Department of Health Care Organization and Policy’s MCH Policy and Leadership concentration. 3 hours (Preskitt)
 
HCO 607: Public Health Law- The purpose of the course is to introduce non-lawyers to the United States legal system and to the basic principles of law relevant to public health practitioners. The course provides a survey of the legal principles governing selected public health problems as derived from court decisions, statutes, and regulations. Topics include constitutional limits, privacy, free speech, tort law, immunization, personal control measures (isolation and quarantine), and economic regulation. 3 hours (Nelson) 
 
HCO 608/708Reproductive Health- Examines key areas of reproductive health including contraception and family planning, sexual health and sexually transmitted diseases, unwanted pregnancies, health pregnancy and safe motherhood, and adolescent reproductive health.  Content addresses measurement, prevalence, determinants and consequences of reproductive health problems; issues of survey design, research methods, and analysis; and development, implementation, and evaluation of reproductive health policies and services to low-to middle-income. 3 hours (Kulczycki)
 
HCO 609. Needs Assessment and Program Planning, Implementation , and Evaluation- The purpose of this course is to introduce students to basic research methods used by public health professional practitioners, with a specific focus on their application in the MCH field; 2) to introduce the needs assessment and program planning, implementation and evaluation processes specifically elate to public health; and 3) to provide practical educational experiences to develop skills in applying research methods and essential skills needed to conduct needs assessments and use the information  gathered to plan, and evaluate public health programs and impact public health policies. 3 hours (Preskitt)   
 
HCO 612. Strategic Management in Health Programs- Provides a framework for strategic management in health care and public health organizations and provides opportunities to develop strategic plans for health care organization.  Objectives are: to relate prior knowledge and experience to specific problem-solving situations; encourage strategic thinking in decision making in health care organizations; provide opportunities to engage in and manage a group decision-making process; gain experience in analyzing the public health environment and prepare a strategic plan for that environment; and develop implementation plans to accomplish strategic plans. 3 hours (Ginter)
 
HCO 615/715. Finance for Health Professionals- Financial management of public health care organizations.  Emphasis on time value on money, capital raising methods, cost of capital, capital budgeting methods and working capital policy.  Problem-solving orientation with applications to public health issues. 3 hours (Rucks)
 
HCO 618/718. Management Concepts in Public Health Programs- Organization structure, management, finance and budgeting, human resources, contracts, negotiation, and operations research in public health settings. Presentation of general principles combined with study of actual cases from practice.  Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. 3 hours (Duncan)
 
HCO 620/720. Health Insurance and Managed Care- Insurance as mechanism for dealing with consequences of an uncertain world.  Health insurance and its consequences as significant reasons health care markets differ from others.  Workings of insurance markets and current policy issues.  Demand for health insurance, underwriting, rate making, moral hazard and adverse selection, HMOs and PPOs, employer health benefits and self insurance, Medicare and Medicaid, long term care insurance and catastrophic coverage. Prerequisite: HCO 601 or equivalent. 3 hours (Nelson)
 
HCO 621/721. Clinical Decision Making and Cost-Effectiveness Analysis- The objectives of this course are to acquaint public health and other professionals with techniques of decision making under conditions of uncertainty and the basics of cost-effectiveness analysis.  Topics include decision analysis, Markov processes, Monte Carlo simulation, valuing diagnostic tests, and measuring the costs and outcomes of health service programs.  Students who successfully complete the course will be able to understand the strengths and limitations of these types of analysis and determine the relevance of research findings to their on areas of expertise. Prerequisite: HCO 601,BST 611, BST 612, or Permission of instructor. 3 hours (Kilgore)
 
HCO 623. Pharmacoeconomics and RegulationThis course covers the process of drug and device regulation, patent and tort law, and the economic implications of the current regulatory environment. Students should be able to describe the basic laws and processes governing drug approval and marketing, the role of the Food and Drug Administration, and the provisions for exclusive marketing of new drugs and the introduction of generics. Students will be able to assess the effects of proposals to change the approval process and the way drug prices are set. 3 hours (Kilgore) 
 
HCO 624. MCH Nutrition and Physical Activity for Healthy Lifestyles- This proposed course will look at nutrition and physical activity from the community nutrition and physical activity viewpoint.  It will explore nutrition and physical activity in the MCH population and students will become aware of the different public health venues where current interventions are occurring as well as where intervention can occur.  This course will help students design an intervention as well as develop a policy paper to support the intervention. Students will learn strategies for promoting healthy lifestyles through improved eating and physical activity behaviors within communities. Focus on the application of community-based planning based on five cornerstones: access, collaboration, science and research, workforce, and communication will be included in this course throughout the semester. 3 hours (Spear)
 
HCO 625. Advanced Leadership in Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Part I: Introduction to Leadership- The Advanced Leadership in MCH course series is offered as three one-hour courses. For students in the MPH or DrPH programs in the MCH concentration in HCOP, all 3 courses are required. Others students may take individual segments for one hour credit with permission of the instructor. HCO 625 provides students with the leadership skills necessary to work effectively at a community, state or regional level in the capacity of designing and advocating for programs and policies necessary to promote the health of women, children and families. 1 hour (Ginter)
 
HCO 626. Advanced Leadership in Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Part II: Collaborative Leadership and Advocacy- Equip students with knowledge and skills needed to provide leadership in the development and delivery of needed programs and policies to promote the health and well being of MCH and other populations. Focus on honing leadership skills beneficial to MCH public health practice. Students are encouraged to challenge the status quo through the analysis of policy-based case studies and researching leadership challenges for MCH programs. Prerequisite HCO 625 or permission of instructor. 1 hour (Rucks)
 
HCO 627Advanced Leadership in Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Part III: Into the Streets: Leadership Field Experience- Provide students with opportunities to apply the leadership skills necessary to work effectively at a community, state or regional level to design and advocate for programs and policies that promote the health of women, children and families. Includes lectures, small group discussions, exercises, individual project work, and on-line service-learning field-based activities, usually linked to the internship or other field-based experiences. Prerequisite HCO 625 and 626, or permission of instructor. 1 hour (Wingate)
 
HCO 628/728. Qualitative and Mixed Methods Research in Public Health- The main purpose of the course is to facilitate the development of knowledge and skills related to conducting qualitative and mixed methods research in public health: with a specific focus on the use of these methods in the maternal and child health, sexual health, and reproductive health fields. This course is designed to familiarize students who have little or no experience in conducting qualitative research with the perspectives, methods, and techniques of a vast tradition of research. The course will cover some of the methods of data collections used in the conduct of qualitative inquiries, the analysis of textual data, the write-up of findings from qualitative studies, and the development of a qualitative research proposals and reports.   The main purpose of the bulk of the course is to facilitate the development of knowledge and skills related to conducting qualitative research in public health.   A few classes towards the end of the semester will introduce mixed-methods research, in which qualitative and quantitative research methods are combined in a single line of research inquiry. 3 hours (Turan)
 
HCO 629/729. Immigrant Health- This course is designed to provide students with foundational knowledge of the range of issues shaping immigrant health in the US and an overview of select health and disease burdens among immigrants in the US.  The course will also help students build skills to critically assess information on immigrant health and develop culturally competent approaches to conduct research with and/or design programs for immigrant populations. Given the diversity of the immigrant population in the US and range of health influences and outcomes, there will be many topics that we will not have sufficient time to address in detail.  However, through suggested readings and class assignments, students can develop more in-depth knowledge of a particular group or topic interest. 3 hours (White)
 
HCO 631. Public Health Demography- Focuses on principles of demography (the study of population) as related to public health.  Course content covers: the measurement and analysis of fertility, mortality, migration, population size, and composition; sources and evaluation of demographic data, techniques of population projection; and determinants and consequences of population trends and processes, with applications for health and health care. 3 hours (Kulczycki)
 
HCO 632. Readings in Maternal and Child Health- Critical analysis of literature in focused area of maternal and child health under supervision of faculty member. Pass/No Pass. 1-3 hours
 
HCO 633. Research Design and Analysis - This course is designed to provide graduate students with an introduction to fundamental tools needed to propose, conduct, and assess outcomes of their research. The course will take them from the basics of developing hypotheses to conducting literature reviews (including an introduction to legal research) and critically analyzing literature reviewed; to formalizing constructs to be addressed and developing valid, accurate and reliable tools/techniques to measure those constructs; and will finally address how to analyze and interpret results. Tools/techniques will include qualitative and quantitative methods such as survey design, focus group design, and simulation. 3 hours (Hites)
 
HCO 635. Grant Writing and Programming Awards in Public HealthThis course will provide you with in-demand skills necessary to possess when seeking a job in the field of public health. You will learn how to 1) communicate your ideas effectively and persuasively; 2) write clearly and succinctly; 3) prepare a coherent, logical research plan; and 4) develop an organizational and management plan for carrying out your work. At the completion of this course, students will have written a grant proposal that is suitable for submission to an extramural funding agency. 3 hours (Locher, Turan, White)
 
HCO 640/740. Disaster and Emergency Management- This course will provide a concerted look into the realm of disaster and emergency management.  Discussions in the course will concentrate on how disaster and emergency management has changed since 9/11 including new legislation and governmental structures.  The course will culminate with a look at the roles and responsibilities of the public health system in preparing for and responding to both natural and man-initiated disasters.  This course is intended for advanced MPH or doctoral students with an interest in preparedness policy, emergency management, or public health preparedness. Course graded as letter. 3 hours (McCormick)
 
HCO 641/741. Preparedness and Response Policy- This course will focus on the development of public policy in the U.S. and the evolution of preparedness policy since September 2001. Students should gain both a capacity for framing issues in order to influence policy makers and public discourse and an understanding of how preparedness policy affects the public health system in the U.S. 3 hours (McCormick)
 
HCO 643/743. Emergency Preparedness Exercises, Evaluation, and Communication- This course will provide participants with an understanding of Public Health Emergency Preparedness (PHEP), exercise development, and evaluation. During this course you will learn how to identify threats within your community, determine what capabilities are most needed to prepare for and meet these threats, and how to develop and evaluate exorcises to test knowledge, skills and abilities. 3 hours (Hites)
 
HCO 670. Social and Ethical Issues in Public Health- This class examines situations where public health programs or policies create or become embroiled in social controversies.  Topics examined include:  the underlying social conflicts involved in these controversies, the nature of the types of groups involved, and the ethical dilemmas that face decision makers in these situations. 3 hours ( Hites)
 
HCO 672/772. Perinatal Health: Issues, Data, and Policies- This course will focus primarily on perinatal U.S. health problems although examples from international settings will be utilized. Data analyses will focus on U.S. data. Course work includes article critiques; a literature review and presentation; and a final exam. The course will include lectures, discussions, in-class computer sessions and computer assignments. Students will gain information on maternal morbidity and mortality, birth weight, gestational age, fetal growth, and infant mordities (injuries, birth defects, etc.). Students also will learn about data sources for perinatal health issues and be guided through hands-on exercises using SAS and a population-based dataset. The course will culminate with a field-based experience that will illustrate the effects of some adverse perinatal outcomes on children and their families. 3 hours (Wingate)
 
HCO 677. Patient-Based Outcomes Measurement- Detailed examination of patient-based outcomes measurement in the context of health care delivery systems and health care policy.  Topics include: Theories and development of outcome evaluation instruments; disease-specific and generic measures of outcome; utility estimation; mediators and moderators of health outcomes; issues in instrument selection and administration; methods for evaluating outcomes data; and uses of outcomes data.  Prerequisites: BST 601, BST 602 or Permission of Instructor. 3 hours (Locher)
 
HCO 687/787. Empirical Methods for Health Research- The objectives of the course are to provide thorough treatment of simple and multivariate regression models, simple binary dependent variable models, instrumental variables estimators, sample selection and two-part models, and simple panel data models.  Course provides students with an opportunity to acquire hands-on software.  This course is designed for students who have had limited experience with regression analysis but a working knowledge of simple statistics, probability distributions, and basic calculus. Prerequisite:  Upper level undergraduate or graduate course in statistics and probability; basic calculus. 3 hours (Sen)
 
HCO 691. Policy Analysis: Modeling and Simulation- Training in basic skills necessary to design, test, implement, manage, present, and critique policy analysis in health care sector.  Fundamentals of policy research design, and linkage between theory and operation.  Various research techniques examined case studies and analyses of secondary data.  Emphasis on choosing appropriate analytical strategies for particular policy issues.  Data analysis using computers and critical evaluation of technical policy literature.  Special topics in econometrics also addressed.  Original policy analytic paper required at end of sequence.  Prerequisites: HCO 601 or equivalent, BST 600 or higher recommended. 3 hours (Mennemeyer)
 
HCO 695. Seminar in Health Care Organization and Policy- Factors currently influencing finance and administration of public and private health programs: availability, accessibility, and utilization by selected population groups. 
 
HCO 697. Internship- Field experience under joint direction of faculty member and qualified specialist working in selected aspects of public health. Written report specifying activities, products, and outcomes of experience required upon completing the internship. Pass/No Pass. 3,6,9 hours
 
HCO 698. Master's Directed Research, Health Care Organization and Policy- Independent study with guidance of appropriate faculty. Pass/No Pass. 1-9 hours.
 
HCO 699. Master's Project Research, Health Care Organization and Policy- Research for project under direction of research project committee. Pass/No Pass.1-9 hours.
 
HCO 701/601. Health Economics- Economics as systematic way of thinking about use of resources.  Tools of economics applied to issues of organization, delivery, financing, and outcome of health care.  Develops economic principles and describes system of health care financing and delivery in the United States, providing basis for analyzing health management and policy options. With didactic coursework provided in HCO 601, doctoral students prepare a major paper under instructor's direction.  Prerequisite:  BST 601 or equivalent. 3 hours (Sen, Becker, Mennemeyer)
 
HCO 703/603. Public Health Policy- Theoretical framework and concepts used to understand evolution of public health policies and processes of policy formulation, implementation, and change. Significance of health policy for public health practical foundation of knowledge and skills useful in analyzing and responding to policy environment. Doctoral students will have an emphasis on independent analysis of health policy issues.  Prerequisite:  HCO 601 or HCO 701 recommended. 3 hours (Becker)
 
HCO 708/608Reproductive Health- Examines key areas of reproductive health including contraception and family planning, sexual health and sexually transmitted diseases, unwanted pregnancies, health pregnancy and safe motherhood, and adolescent reproductive health.  Content addresses measurement, prevalence, determinants and consequences of reproductive health problems; issues of survey design, research methods, and analysis; and development, implementation, and evaluation of reproductive health policies and services to low-to middle-income. 3 hours (Kulczycki)
 
HCO 715/615. Finance for Health Professionals- Financial management of public health care organizations.  Emphasis on time value on money, capital raising methods, cost of capital, capital budgeting methods and working capital policy.  Problem-solving orientation with applications to public health issues. 3 hours (Rucks)
 
HCO 718/618. Management Concepts in Public Health Programs- Organization structure, management, finance and budgeting, human resources, contracts, negotiation, and operations research in public health settings. Presentation of general principles combined with study of actual cases from practice.  Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. 3 hours (Duncan)
 
HCO 720/620. Health Insurance and Managed Care- Insurance as mechanism for dealing with consequences of an uncertain world.  health insurance and its consequences as significant reasons health care markets differ from others.  Workings of insurance markets and current policy issues.  Demand for health insurance, underwriting, rate making, moral hazard and adverse selection, HMOs and PPOs, employer health benefits and self insurance, Medicare and Medicaid, long term care insurance and catastrophic coverage. Prerequisite: HCO 601 or equivalent. 3 hours (Nelson)
 
HCO 721/621. Clinical Decision Making and Cost-Effectiveness Analysis- The objectives of this course are to acquaint public health and other professionals with techniques of decision making under conditions of uncertainty and the basics of cost-effectiveness analysis.  Topics include decision analysis, Markov processes, Monte Carlo simulation, valuing diagnostic tests, and measuring the costs and outcomes of health service programs.  Students who successfully complete the course will be able to understand the strengths and limitations of these types of analysis and determine the relevance of research findings to their on areas of expertise. Prerequisite: HCO 601,BST 611, BST 612, or Permission of instructor. 3 hours (Kilgore)
 
HCO 722/622. Cost-Effectiveness Research Methods- The objective of this course is to familiarize students with the design and implementation of cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit analysis.  Specific topics include cost estimation, effectiveness measurement, time preference, uncertainty, ethical issues, valuing health outcomes, and ethical issues in cost-effectiveness research.  At the end of the course students will develop and present analysis plans related to their particular fields of practice. Prerequisite: HCO 621 or Permission of instructor. 3 hours (Kilgore)
 
HCO 728/628. Qualitative and Mixed Methods Research in Public Health- The main purpose of the course is to facilitate the development of knowledge and skills related to conducting qualitative and mixed methods research in public health: with a specific focus on the use of these methods in the maternal and child health, sexual health, and reproductive health fields. This course is designed to familiarize students who have little or no experience in conducting qualitative research with the perspectives, methods, and techniques of a vast tradition of research. The course will cover some of the methods of data collections used in the conduct of qualitative inquiries, the analysis of textual data, the write-up of findings from qualitative studies, and the development of a qualitative research proposals and reports.   The main purpose of the bulk of the course is to facilitate the development of knowledge and skills related to conducting qualitative research in public health.   A few classes towards the end of the semester will introduce mixed-methods research, in which qualitative and quantitative research methods are combined in a single line of research inquiry. 3 hours (Turan)
 
HCO 740/640. Disaster and Emergency Management- This course will provide a concerted look into the realm of disaster and emergency management.  Discussions in the course will concentrate on how disaster and emergency management has changed since 9/11 including new legislation and governmental structures.  The course will culminate with a look at the roles and responsibilities of the public health system in preparing for and responding to both natural and man-initiated disasters.  This course is intended for advanced MPH or doctoral students with an interest in preparedness policy, emergency management, or public health preparedness. Course graded as letter. 3 hours (McCormick)
 
HCO 741/641. Preparedness and Response Policy- This course will focus on the development of public policy in the U.S. and the evolution of preparedness policy since September 2001. Students should gain both a capacity for framing issues in order to influence policy makers and public discourse and an understanding of how preparedness policy affects the public health system in the U.S. 3 hours (McCormick)
 
HCO 743/643. Emergency Preparedness Exercises, Evaluation, and Communication- This course will provide participants with an understanding of Public Health Emergency Preparedness (PHEP), exercise development, and evaluation. During this course you will learn how to identify threats within your community, determine what capabilities are most needed to prepare for and meet these threats, and how to develop and evaluate exorcises to test knowledge, skills and abilities. 3 hours (Hites)
 
HCO 781. Research Methods and Study Design- The course supplements the material covered in HCO 787, with a focus on the sensible application of econometric methods to important topics in health research. The course will begin with an overview of experimental and non-experimental research and the critical distinction between associative and causal relationships. The remainder of the course will focus on the difficulty of identifying causal relationships in non-experimental contexts, and the methods that are commonly used to overcome these challenges. At the end of the semester, students should come away with an improved grasp of the interdisciplinary language of health research and a deeper appreciation of the importance of research design. 3 hours (Becker) 
 
HCO 787/687. Empirical Methods for Health Research- The objectives of the course are to provide thorough treatment of simple and multivariate regression models, simple binary dependent variable models, instrumental variables estimators, sample selection and two-part models, and simple panel data models.  Course provides students with an opportunity to acquire hands-on software.  This course is designed for students who have had limited experience with regression analysis but a working knowledge of simple statistics, probability distributions, and basic calculus. Prerequisite:  Upper level undergraduate or graduate course in statistics and probability; basic calculus. 3 hours (Sen)
 
HCO 788Longitudinal Methods in Health Services Research- This course provides an intermediate treatment of econo­metric and biostatistical methods for longitudinal analyses of data in public health. 3 hours (Blackburn)
 
HCO 791. Policy Analysis: Modeling and Simulation- Training in basic skills necessary to design, test, implement, manage, present, and critique policy analysis in health care sector. Fundamentals of policy research design and linkage between theory and operation. Various research techniques examined, case studies, and analyses of secondary data. Emphasis on choosing appropriate analytical strategies for particular policy issues. Data analysis using computers and critical evaluation of technical policy literature. Special topics in econometrics also addressed. Original policy analytic paper required at end of sequence. Prerequisites: HCO 601 or equivalent, BST 600 or higher recommended. 3 hours (Mennemeyer)
 
HCO 793. DrPH Practicum in HCO- Doctoral students are required to complete a 6 hour practicum working in a public health agency or organization. Students should have passed their comprehensive exam prior to enrolling in HCO 793. Pass/No Pass. 3-6 hours.
 
HCO 795. Directed Readings for Doctoral Students- Independent study with guidance of appropriate faculty. Pass/No Pass. 1-9 hours.
 
HCO 796. Doctoral Seminar in Health Care Organization and Policy- Through participation in this course, students will be introduced to advanced topics in public health and management research. Students are required to register for the seminar course each fall and spring semester they are enrolled. 1 hour (Becker)
 
HCO 797. Directed Readings for DrPH Comprehensive Exam in Health Care Organization and Policy- Assists students in preparing for the comprehensive exam. Doctoral Students may register in the semester in which they prepare for and take their comprehensive exam. Pass/No Pass. 3 hours
 
HCO 798. Dissertation Protocol Development in Health Care Organization and Policy- Assists students with their dissertation protocol development. Doctoral Students may register for this course during the period in which they are preparing their doctoral dissertation protocol. Pass/No Pass. 3 hours
 
HCO 799. Dissertation Research in Health Care Organization and Policy- Research for dissertation under direction of dissertation committee. Pass/No Pass. 1-9 hours.