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Health Care Organization and Policy Courses (HCO)

HCO 600. Introduction to Public Health Systems and Population –Based Health Programs.- This course presents selected information, concepts, and methods from the field of public health.  Topics concerning the structure, financing and current status of the US health care system, as well as the history, organization, financing, and services of the public health system are discussed.  All topics are presented from a population-based perspective. 3 hours (Rucks, Wingate, Mennemeyer)
 
HCO 601/701. Health Economics- Economics as systematic way of thinking about use of resources.  Tools of economics applied to issues of organization, delivery, financing, and outcome of health care.  Develops economic principles and describes system of health care financing and delivery in the United States, providing basis for analyzing health management and policy options. With didactic coursework provided in HCO 601, doctoral students prepare a major paper under instructor's direction.  3 hours (Sen, Becker, Mennemeyer)
 

HCO 602. Narrative Public Health- The purpose of this course is to develop communication skills primarily through written exercises directly relevant to public health.  Each exercise will explore and teach students different formats and techniques for communicating complex public health information to different audiences, such as colleagues, the lay public, public officials, or potential future public health students. Prerequisite: Only available to School of Public Health degree seeking students. 3 hours (Michael/Rudd)

HCO 603/703. Public Health Policy- Theoretical framework and concepts used to understand evolution of public health policies and processes of policy formulation, implementation, and change. Significance of health policy for public health practical foundation of knowledge and skills useful in analyzing and responding to policy environment. Doctoral students will have an emphasis on independent analysis of health policy issues. 3 hours (Becker)

HCO 605.  Fundamentals of Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Part I: Issues, Programs & Policies- Provides students with knowledge about current MCH health, social, economic, and environmental issues; programs and policies for women of reproductive age, infants, and children. Required for the MPH degree in the Department of Health Care Organization and Policy’s MCH Policy and Leadership concentration. 4 hours (Wingate)

HCO 606.  Fundamentals of Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Part II: Research Methods, Needs Assessment and Program Planning- The focus of the first part of the course is on the development of knowledge and skills related to the review, assessment, and conduct of data-based research. The emphasis of the second part of the course is on applying these research skills to the public health planning process, including needs assessment, planning and evaluation. Required for the MPH in HCOP MCH Policy and Leadership concentration. Prerequisite HCO 605. 4 hours (Mulvihill)

HCO 608/708. Reproductive Health in Developing Countries-  Examines key areas of reproductive health including contraception and family planning, sexual health and sexually transmitted diseases, unwanted pregnancies, health pregnancy and safe motherhood, and adolescent reproductive health.  Content addresses measurement, prevalence, determinants and consequences of reproductive health problems; issues of survey design, research methods, and analysis; and development, implementation, and evaluation of reproductive health policies and services to low-to middle-income. 3 hours (Kulczycki)

HCO 611/711. Child Health and Development:  Womb to Young Adulthood- Focuses on the key developmental processes that influence health outcomes from the prenatal period through early childbearing years.  Processes and outcomes are linked to MCH programs, policies, resources, and barriers relevant to these populations.  3 hours (Mulvihill)

HCO 612. Strategic Management in Health Programs-  Provides a framework for strategic management in health care and public health organizations and provides opportunities to develop strategic plans for health care organization.  Objectives are: to relate prior knowledge and experience to specific problem-solving situations; encourage strategic thinking in decision making in health care organizations; provide opportunities to engage in and manage a group decision-making process; gain experience in analyzing the public health environment and prepare a strategic plan for that environment; and develop implementation plans to accomplish strategic plans. 3 hours (Ginter)

HCO 613/713. Health Information Technology and Policy-  The overall goal of the course is to familiarize students with current issues associated with health information technology (IT) and their impact on the U.S. healthcare system. Health IT applications (e.g., electronic health records, computerized physician order entry systems, decision support systems, health information exchanges, etc.) are playing an increasingly important role in the efficiency and effectiveness of healthcare delivery and management. 3 hours (Menachemi)

HCO 615/715. Finance for Health Professionals-  Financial management of public health care organizations.  Emphasis on time value on money, capital raising methods, cost of capital, capital budgeting methods and working capital policy.  Problem-solving orientation with applications to public health issues. 3 hours (Rucks)

HCO 617. International Children's Rights and Social Justice: Global Perspectives- Familiarizes students with public health and legal issues with regard to children.  The course provides background on international law and international human rights law, and international treaties focused particularly on children, followed by the role of public health in achieving these rights and lessening the gap between theory and practice. Prerequisites: Only available to School of Public Health degree seeking students. 3 hours (Altarac)

HCO 618/718. Management Concepts in Public Health Programs-  Organization structure, management, finance and budgeting, human resources, contracts, negotiation, and operations research in public health settings. Presentation of general principles combined with study of actual cases from practice.  Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor 3 hours (Duncan)

HCO 619. Social Work in Public Health- Introduction and overview of the field of public health and the subspecialty of public health social work.  Provides information about practical macro-level skills and increases the knowledge of students regarding the role and functions of advanced-trained social workers within major public health programs. 3 hours (Mulvihill)

HCO 620/720. Health Insurance and Managed Care- Insurance as mechanism for dealing with consequences of an uncertain world.  health insurance and its consequences as significant reasons health care markets differ from others.  Workings of insurance markets and current policy issues.  Demand for health insurance, underwriting, rate making, moral hazard and adverse selection, HMOs and PPOs, employer health benefits and self insurance, Medicare and Medicaid, long term care insurance and catastrophic coverage. Prerequisite: HCO 601 or equivalent. 3 hours (Morrisey)

HCO 621/721. Clinical Decision Making and Cost-Effectiveness Analysis- The objectives of this course are to acquaint public health and other professionals with techniques of decision making under conditions of uncertainty and the basics of cost-effectiveness analysis.  Topics include decision analysis, Markov processes, Monte Carlo simulation, valuing diagnostic tests, and measuring the costs and outcomes of health service programs.  Students who successfully complete the course will be able to understand the strengths and limitations of these types of analysis and determine the relevance of research findings to their on areas of expertise. Prerequisite: HCO 601,BST 611, BST 612, or Permission of instructor. 3 hours. (Kilgore)

HCO 622/722. Cost-Effectiveness Research Methods- The objective of this course is to familiarize students with the design and implementation of cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit analysis.  Specific topics include cost estimation, effectiveness measurement, time preference, uncertainty, ethical issues, valuing health outcomes, and ethical issues in cost-effectiveness research.  At the end of the course students will develop and present analysis plans related to their particular fields of practice. Prerequisite: HCO 621 or Permission of instructor. 3 hours. (Kilgore)

HCO 625. Advanced Leadership in Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Part I: Introduction to Leadership- The Advanced Leadership in MCH course series is offered as three one-hour courses. For students in the MPH or DrPH programs in the MCH concentration in HCOP, all 3 courses are required. Others students may take individual segments for one hour credit with permission of the instructor. HCO 625 provides students with the leadership skills necessary to work effectively at a community, state or regional level in the capacity of designing and advocating for programs and policies necessary to promote the health of women, children and families. 1 hour (Duncan, Ginter, Mulvihill, Pass)

HCO 626. Advanced Leadership in Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Part II: Collaborative Leadership and Advocacy- Equip students with knowledge and skills needed to provide leadership in the development and delivery of needed programs and policies to promote the health and well being of MCH and other populations. Focus on honing leadership skills beneficial to MCH public health practice. Students are encouraged to challenge the status quo through the analysis of policy-based case studies and researching leadership challenges for MCH programs. Prerequisite HCO 625 or permission of instructor. 1 hour. (Mulvihill, Pass, Rucks)

HCO 627. Advanced Leadership in Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Part III: Into the Streets: Leadership Field Experience- Provide students with opportunities to apply the leadership skills necessary to work effectively at a community, state or regional level to design and advocate for programs and policies that promote the health of women, children and families. Includes lectures, small group discussions, exercises, individual project work, and on-line service-learning field-based activities, usually linked to the internship or other field-based experiences. Prerequisite HCO 625 and 626, or permission of instructor. 1 hour (Mulvihill, Wingate)

HCO 631. Public Health Demography- Focuses on principles of demography (the study of population) as related to public health.  Course content covers: the measurement and analysis of fertility, mortality, migration, population size, and composition; sources and evaluation of demographic data, techniques of population projection; and determinants and consequences of population trends and processes, with applications for health and health care. 3 hours (Kulczycki)

HCO 632. Readings in Maternal and Child Health- Critical analysis of literature in focused area of maternal and child health under supervision of faculty member.1-3 hours Pass/Fail

HCO 640/740. Disaster and Emergency Management- This course will provide a concerted look into the realm of disaster and emergency management.  Discussions in the course will concentrate on how disaster and emergency management has changed since 9/11 including new legislation and governmental structures.  The course will culminate with a look at the roles and responsibilities of the public health system in preparing for and responding to both natural and man-initiated disasters.  This course is intended for advanced MPH or doctoral students with an interest in preparedness policy, emergency management, or public health preparedness. Course graded as letter. 3 hours (McCormick/Ginter)

HCO 641/741. Preparedness and Response Policy- This course will focus on the development of public policy in the U.S. and the evolution of preparedness policy since September 2001. Students should gain both a capacity for framing issues in order to influence policy makers and public discourse and an understanding of how preparedness policy affects the public health system in the U.S. (McCormick, Ginter)

HCO 642/742. Preparedness and Agriculture- This course presents the potential effects of an animal disease outbreak, whether natural, accidental or deliberate, on the affected communities.  Topics covering the prevention and diagnosis of and the response to an animal disease outbreak will be presented.  Examples of the interaction of public health with other disciplines will be provided.  This course is designed for MPH students with an interest in preparedness policy, emergency management, or public health preparedness.  Note:  It is preferred that this course is completed during the final year of enrollment; however, any MPH candidate who has completed the entire core curriculum is eligible to enroll in the course.  Course graded by letter. 3 hours (Fields)

HCO 643/743. Communication Issues in Disaster Preparedness- This course will provide participants with an understanding of the psychological processes that occur during crises, how those processes impact human functioning, and how communication plays a critical role in the psychological outcome of crisis situations.  Course graded by letter. 3 hours (Klapow)

HCO 644. Needs Assessment, Program Planning, and Evaluation:  The Public Health Planning Process (also MCH 609)- To introduce the needs assessment, program planning, and evaluation processes specifically related to public health and provide practical educational experiences to develop skills in the range of activities needed to conduct needs assessments and use the information gathered to plan, direct, evaluate public health programs, and impact public health policies. Course graded by letter. 3 hours (Wingate/Mulvihill)

HCO 670. Social and Ethical Issues in Public Health- This class examines situations where public health programs or policies create or become embroiled in social controversies.  Topics examined include:  the underlying social conflicts involved in these controversies, the nature of the types of groups involved, and the ethical dilemmas that face decision makers in these situations. 3 hours (Bronstein)

HCO 675. Improving Health Care Quality Outcomes- Examination of current issues in quality of care and outcomes management.  The course includes a review of past and current efforts, tools, and theories of quality assessment, assurance, utilization management, and measuring and improving outcomes. 3 hours (Van Matre)

HCO 677. Patient-Based Outcomes Measurement-  Detailed examination of patient-based outcomes measurement in the context of health care delivery systems and health care policy.  Topics include: Theories and development of outcome evaluation instruments; disease-specific and generic measures of outcome; utility estimation; mediators and moderators of health outcomes; issues in instrument selection and administration; methods for evaluating outcomes data; and uses of outcomes data.  Prerequisites: BST 601, BST 602 or Permission of Instructor. 3 hours (Klapow)

HCO 680. Aging Policy- Providing for the physical and economic well-being of the aging population is a continual challenge facing society.  The objectives of this course are to develop an understanding of the influence of demographic changes, economic factors, and public policy on the health status and health care of the aging population; investigate the work, retirement, savings, and health insurance decisions facing the elderly; describe the system of health care financing and delivery arrangements for the elderly in the United states and other developing countries.  Prerequisites: Basic biostatistics or equivalent. 3 hours (Locher)

HCO 686/786. Integrative Health Policy Analysis- The aim of this interdisciplinary course is to engage students in critical thinking about  the goals, paradigms, effectiveness and implementation of health care policy in the United States.  The course will incorporate several concepts from public policy analysis, public policymaking, health politics, public opinion research, media research, and technical-writing communication. Note: There are no prerequisite course requirements; however, students are expected to be familiar with the basics of the U.S. health care system and prior experience in health policy will be useful.  Course graded by letter. 3 hours (Gary)

HCO 687/787. Empirical Methods for Health Research- The objectives of the course are to provide thorough treatment of simple and multivariate regression models, simple binary dependent variable models, instrumental variables estimators, sample selection and two-part models, and simple panel data models.  Course provides students with an opportunity to acquire hands-on software.  This course is designed for students who have had limited experience with regression analysis but a working knowledge of simple statistics, probability distributions, and basic calculus. Prerequisite:  Upper level undergraduate or graduate course in statistics and probability; basic calculus. 3 hours (Sen)

HCO 692. Advanced Topics in Health Disparities Research- The primary aim of this course is to engage students in critical thinking about the current paradigms for health care disparities research in the U.S.  As a part of this process, students will be challenged to think about the social, political, and economic determinants of health disparities for diverse health care consumers, to identify substantive trends and gaps in the health disparities literature, and to develop an innovative research or policy-oriented strategy for reducing health disparities. A secondary aim of this course is to provide students with a broad overview of health and health care disparities according to race/ethnicity, gender, and health status.  The three specific racial/ethnic groups are: African Americans, Hispanic/Latinos, and Asian/Pacific Islanders. The gender classifications include men and women.  The health status groupings include persons with chronic health problems (such as diabetes or a mental health condition, e.g., schizophrenia). Course graded by letter. 3 hours (Gary)

HCO 693. Policy Analysis: Modeling and Simulation- Training in basic skills necessary to design, test, implement, manage, present, and critique policy analysis in health care sector.  Fundamentals of policy research design, and linkage between theory and operation.  Various research techniques examined case studies and analyses of secondary data.  Emphasis on choosing appropriate analytical strategies for particular policy issues.  Data analysis using computers and critical evaluation of technical policy literature.  Special topics in econometrics also addressed.  Original policy analytic paper required at end of sequence.  Prerequisites: HCO 601 or equivalent, BST 600 or higher recommended. 3 hours (Mennemeyer)

HCO 694. Special Problems in Policy Analysis- (Continuation of HCO 693) Prerequisite: HCO 693. 3 hours (Mennemeyer)

HCO 695. Seminar in Health Care Organization- Factors currently influencing finance and administration of public and private health programs; availability, accessibility, and utilization by selected population groups. Prerequisites: MPH core or permission of instructor.

HCO 696. Selected Topics in Public Health Finance- Financing of public health programs; sources of revenue (grants and contracts, tax revenues, and service fees), capital financing, and management of cash flows  Techniques of maximizing revenues in public health programs.  Prerequisite: HCO 601 3 hours.

HCO 697. Internship- Field experience under joint direction of faculty member and qualified specialist working in selected aspects of public health. Written report specifying activities, products, and outcomes of experience required upon completing the internship. Pass/No Pass.3,6,9 hours

HCO 698. Master's Directed Research, Health Care Organization and Policy- Independent study with guidance of appropriate faculty. Pass/No Pass.1 - 9 hours.

HCO 699. Master's Project Research, Health Care Organization and Policy- Research for project under direction of research project committee. Pass/No Pass.1- 9 hours.

HCO 701/601. Health Economics- Economics as systematic way of thinking about use of resources.  Tools of economics applied to issues of organization, delivery, financing, and outcome of health care.  Develops economic principles and describes system of health care financing and delivery in the United States, providing basis for analyzing health management and policy options. With didactic coursework provided in HCO 601, doctoral students prepare a major paper under instructor's direction.  Prerequisite:  BST 601 or equivalent. 3 hours (Sen, Becker, Mennemeyer)

HCO 703/603. Public Health Policy- Theoretical framework and concepts used to understand evolution of public health policies and processes of policy formulation, implementation, and change. Significance of health policy for public health practical foundation of knowledge and skills useful in analyzing and responding to policy environment. Doctoral students will have an emphasis on independent analysis of health policy issues.  Prerequisite:  HCO 601 or HCO 701 recommended. 3 hours (Becker)

HCO 704. Advanced Health Economics- Advanced analysis of economic concepts important to public health problems; government financing of health services, public health deliver, utilization of health, and public health services; and perspectives and policy issues in public health.  Prerequisites: HCO 601 or HCO 701. 3 hours (Sen)

HCO 713/613. Health Information Technology and Policy- The overall goal of the course is to familiarize students with current issues associated with health information technology (IT) and their impact on the U.S. healthcare system. Health IT applications (e.g., electronic health records, computerized physician order entry systems, decision support systems, health information exchanges, etc.) are playing an increasingly important role in the efficiency and effectiveness of healthcare delivery and management. 3 hours (Menachemi)

HCO 715/615. Finance for Health Professionals- Financial management of public health care organizations.  Emphasis on time value on money, capital raising methods, cost of capital, capital budgeting methods and working capital policy.  Problem-solving orientation with applications to public health issues. 3 hours (Rucks)

HCO 718/618. Management Concepts in Public Health Programs- Organization structure, management, finance and budgeting, human resources, contracts, negotiation, and operations research in public health settings. Presentation of general principles combined with study of actual cases from practice.  Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.  3 hours (Rucks)

HCO 720/620. Health Insurance and Managed Care- Insurance as mechanism for dealing with consequences of an uncertain world.  health insurance and its consequences as significant reasons health care markets differ from others.  Workings of insurance markets and current policy issues.  Demand for health insurance, underwriting, rate making, moral hazard and adverse selection, HMOs and PPOs, employer health benefits and self insurance, Medicare and Medicaid, long term care insurance and catastrophic coverage. Prerequisite: HCO 601 or equivalent. 3 hours (Morrisey)

HCO 721/621. Clinical Decision Making and Cost-Effectiveness Analysis- The objectives of this course are to acquaint public health and other professionals with techniques of decision making under conditions of uncertainty and the basics of cost-effectiveness analysis.  Topics include decision analysis, Markov processes, Monte Carlo simulation, valuing diagnostic tests, and measuring the costs and outcomes of health service programs.  Students who successfully complete the course will be able to understand the strengths and limitations of these types of analysis and determine the relevance of research findings to their on areas of expertise. Prerequisite: HCO 601,BST 611, BST 612, or Permission of instructor. 3 hours. (Kilgore)

HCO 722/622. Cost-Effectiveness Research Methods- The objective of this course is to familiarize students with the design and implementation of cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit analysis.  Specific topics include cost estimation, effectiveness measurement, time preference, uncertainty, ethical issues, valuing health outcomes, and ethical issues in cost-effectiveness research.  At the end of the course students will develop and present analysis plans related to their particular fields of practice. Prerequisite: HCO 621 or Permission of instructor. 3 hours. (Kilgore)

HCO 731. Adolescent Sexuality- Comprehensive review of the causes and consequences of adolescent sexuality, pregnancy, and parenting.  Demographics and time trends; relationship to other problem behaviors of adolescence.  Prerequisite: Only advanced doctoral students (second year and above) can register; masters students must obtain permission of instructor. 3 hours (Altarac)

HCO 740/640. Disaster and Emergency Management- This course will provide a concerted look into the realm of disaster and emergency management.  Discussions in the course will concentrate on how disaster and emergency management has changed since 9/11 including new legislation and governmental structures.  The course will culminate with a look at the roles and responsibilities of the public health system in preparing for and responding to both natural and man-initiated disasters.  This course is intended for advanced MPH or doctoral students with an interest in preparedness policy, emergency management, or public health preparedness. Course graded as letter. 3 hours (McCormick/Ginter)

HCO 741/641. Preparedness and Response Policy- This course will focus on the development of public policy in the U.S. and the evolution of preparedness policy since September 2001. Students should gain both a capacity for framing issues in order to influence policy makers and public discourse and an understanding of how preparedness policy affects the public health system in the U.S. 3 hours (McCormick/Ginter)

HCO 773/673. Applied Global Child Health Policy- The focus of the course will be on four current and complex policy issues (2 domestic; 2 international): refugee health; immunization activities and the link to autism; obesity in children and physical inactivity; and child labor. Pertinent background information related to international, federal, state and local policies and systems will be studied. Students should gain both technical capacity for analysis and an understanding of the health policy process. This course is intended for advanced MPH or doctoral students with an interest in health policy, international health, or maternal and child health. Graded by letter. 3 hours (Wingate)

HCO 786/686. Integrative Health Policy Analysis- The aim of this interdisciplinary course is to engage students in critical thinking about  the goals, paradigms, effectiveness and implementation of health care policy in the United States.  The course will incorporate several concepts from public policy analysis, public policymaking, health politics, public opinion research, media research, and technical-writing communication. Note: There are no prerequisite course requirements; however, students are expected to be familiar with the basics of the U.S. health care system and prior experience in health policy will be useful.  Course graded by letter. 3 hours (Gary)

HCO 787/687. Empirical Methods for Health Research- The objectives of the course are to provide thorough treatment of simple and multivariate regression models, simple binary dependent variable models, instrumental variables estimators, sample selection and two-part models, and simple panel data models.  Course provides students with an opportunity to acquire hands-on software.  This course is designed for students who have had limited experience with regression analysis but a working knowledge of simple statistics, probability distributions, and basic calculus. Prerequisite:  Upper level undergraduate or graduate course in statistics and probability; basic calculus. 3 hours (Sen)

HCO 793. DrPH Practicum in HCO- Doctoral students are required to complete a 6 hour practicum working in a public health agency or organization. Students should have passed their comprehensive exam prior to enrolling in HCO 793. Pass/No Pass. 3-6 hours.

HCO 795. Directed Readings for Doctoral Students- Independent study with guidance of appropriate faculty. Pass/No Pass 1-9 hours.

HCO 796. Doctoral Seminar in Health Care Organization and Policy- Through participation in this course, students will be introduced to advanced topics in public health and management research. Students are required to register for the seminar course each fall and spring semester they are enrolled. 1 hour (Menachemi)

HCO 797. Directed Readings for DrPH Comprehensive Exam in Health Care Organization and Policy- Assists students in preparing for the comprehensive exam. Doctoral Students may register in the semester in which they prepare for and take their comprehensive exam. Pass/No Pass. 3 hours

HCO 798. Dissertation Protocol Development in Health Care Organization and Policy- Assists students with their dissertation protocol development. Doctoral Students may register for this course during the period in which they are preparing their doctoral dissertation protocol. Pass/No Pass. 3 hours

HCO 799. Dissertation Research in Health Care Organization and Policy- Research for dissertation under direction of dissertation committee. Pass/No Pass 1-9 hours.