You are here

Health Behavior Courses (HB)

 

HB 600. Social and Behavioral Science Core. This course is structured to provide students with a basic "starting point" for developing the required competencies in this area.  The course consists of information delivery (e.g., lectures, readings), practice and application exercises, and knowledge integration and synthesis activities. Successful completion of this course will enable you to describe the role of social and community factors in both the onset and solution of public health problems; identify the causes of social and behavioral factors that affect health of individuals and populations; identify basic theories, concepts and models; apply ethical principles to public health program planning, implementation and evaluation; specify multiple targets and levels of intervention; identify individual, organizational and community concerns, assets, resources and deficits; apply evidence-based approaches in the development and evaluation of interventions; describe the merits of social and behavioral science interventions and policies; describe steps and procedures for the planning, implementation and evaluation of public health programs; and identify critical stakeholders for the planning, implementation and evaluation of public health programs, policies and interventions. Course will be graded by letter. 3 hours.
 
HB 600Q.Social and Behavioral Science Core (On-line). This course is structured to provide students with a basic “starting point” for developing the required competencies in this area.  The course consists of information delivery (e.g., lectures, readings), practice and application exercises, and knowledge integration and synthesis activities.  Successful completion of this course will enable you to describe the role of social and community factors in both the onset and solution of public health problems; identify the causes of social and behavioral factors that affect health of individuals and populations; identify basic theories, concepts and models; apply ethical principles to public health program planning, implementation and evaluation; specify multiple targets and levels of intervention; identify individual, organizational and community concerns, assets, resources and deficits; apply evidence-based approaches in the development and evaluation of interventions; describe the merits of social and behavioral science interventions and policies; describe steps and procedures for the planning, implementation and evaluation of public health programs; and identify critical stakeholders for the planning, implementation and evaluation of public health programs, policies and intervention.  Course will be graded by letter.  Course is offered online. 3 hours.
 
HB 602. Alcohol and Drug Abuse. History and theory of human substance use and abuse.  Empirical foundations of alcohol and drug abuse, diagnosis, assessment, treatment, and prevention. Course will be graded by letter. 3 hours.
 
HB 604. High Technology Approaches to Health Communications and Behavior Change Interventions. To present students with an initial, in-depth exposure to concepts, technical skills and research findings associated with the integration of computer technology and health communications. Course will be graded by letter. 3 hours.
 
HB 605. Physical Activity and Health. This seminar course is an introduction to research and practice related to physical activity promotion from a public health perspective and will describe health benefits, epidemiological data, national recommendations and plans, and global initiatives related to physical activity. Course will be graded by letter. 3 hours (Pekmezi).
 
HB 608. Women's health and Social Behavior. This course examines social and behavioral factors that adversely affect women's health.  Students learn to apply gender specific theories to design health interventions tailored towards women. Course will be graded by letter. 3 hours.
HB 609. African-American Health Issues. This is an intermediate-level course that focuses on: epidemiological data illustrating the health risks experienced by African-Americans; sociocultural factors essential for understanding and enhancing the health of African-Americans; effective health-related prevention programs for African-Americans. Course will be graded by letter. 3 hours.
 
HB 611. Mental Illness as a Public Health Issue. This course is designed to increase knowledge of mental illness at the individual, community, and population levels.  It also covers historical and contemporary models and research on the etiology, diagnosis, assessment, treatment and prevention of mental and other behavioral health disorders. Course will be graded by letter. 3 hours.
 
HB 624. Advanced Theory and Practice in Behavioral Science. Advanced review of selected behavioral science concepts and theories useful for developing health promotion programs; social cognitive theory and the transtheoretical model of change are examined in depth.  This course may be required for some MPH students. Course will be graded by letter.  3 hours (Schroder).
 
HB 625. Dissemination and Implementation in Health. The course will offer an introduction to dissemination and implementation science, an interdisciplinary field focused on improving the transition of evidence-based health practices, programs, and interventions from research studies into “real-world” settings. Course will be graded by letter. Pre-requisite: HB 600 & HB 624. 3 hours (Norton).
 
HB 630. Health Communications:  Theory and Practice. This course is designed to investigate the role of communication theories and methods in promoting public health and preventing disease.  Both theoretical background in communication and behavioral science and practical communication/intervention development methods are addressed. Course will be graded by letter. Pre-requisite: HB 624. 3 hours (Kohler).
 
HB 635. Communities, Families and Health. This course is designed for graduate students in public health and related fields interested in working with families and communities to improve health outcomes.  It is intended to provide students with a broader understanding of the structural and psychosocial factors related to health and well-being.  To do so, the course will focus on theoretical frameworks that draw on an ecological perspective and examine how factors associated with families, peers, schools, neighborhoods, and communities influence health.  Emphasis will also be placed on the relevance of individual and community assets for the science of Health Behavior and the broader public health arena.  Course will be graded by letter. 3 hours (Davies/Perkins).
 
HB 638Q.Public Health Promotion and Aging Seminar. Exploration of current problems of the elderly, introduction to broad principles of health promotion for the elderly and review model health promotion programs. Course will be graded by letter. Course offered on-line. 3 hours (Galvin).
 
HB 641. Research Methods in Behavioral Sciences. Review of research methodology in behavioral sciences.  Formulation of research questions, causality, experimental and quasi-experimental designs, reliability and validity, reporting findings. Course will be graded by letter. 3 hours(Lewis/Norton).
 
HB 643. Health Program Evaluation.-Principles and procedures to evaluate health promotion/disease prevention programs: data collection methods, instrument-scale development, measurement, evaluation designs and analysis of case studies of disease prevention literature on evaluation. Course will be graded by letter. Prerequisite: HB 641. 3 hours.
 
HB 660. Adolescent Health: A Social and Behavioral Perspective. Designed to provide students with the most current knowledge and analysis of issues influencing the health and well-being of adolescents. Theoretical frameworks that draw on an ecological perspective will provide a better understanding of how families, peers, schools, and neighborhoods influence risk and protective factors in youth. Emphasis will be placed on the relevance of adolescent health issues for the science of Health Behavior and the broader public health arena. Course will be graded by letter. 3 hours(Lanzi).
 
HB 665. Family Violence & Victimization. This course will focus on multi-disciplinary theoretical frameworks to explain family violence and subsequent effects on child/youth/young adult functioning including behavioral, social, and physical and mental health consequences. Course will be graded by letter. 3 hours(Lewis).
 
HB 680. Health Promotion through Entertainment Education. Alternative methods for delivering health promotion messages to "hard-to-reach" audiences are being explored across the U.S.  This course examines the strategy known as "entertainment education",  Course will be graded as Pass/No Pass. 3 hours (Kohler).
 
HB 692. Principles and Practices of Community Organization. Seminar designed as an integrative experience for persons working with community groups.  The focus is on learning to use available resources and advocating change to maximize community involvement.  Course will be graded by letter. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. 3 hours (Galvin).
 
HB 695. Seminar on Selected Health Behavior Topics. Seminar covering a variety of health behavior topics.  Course will be graded as Pass/No Pass. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 3 hours.
 
HB 697. Internship. Field experience under joint direction of appropriate faculty member and qualified health education specialist. Written report specifying activities, products, and outcomes of experience submitted upon completion of internship. Course will be graded as Pass/No Pass. 3 hours.
 
HB 698. Master's Directed Research. Independent study with guidance of appropriate faculty. Includes activities such as literature review and evaluation. Course will be graded as  Pass/No Pass. 1 - 9 hours.
 
HB 699. Master's Project Research. Research for project under direction of research project committee. Course will be graded as Pass/No Pass. 3-6  hours.
 
HB 701. Theory-Based Measurement Development. The aim of this course is to introduce students to measurement development based on well-specified behavioral theories.  This course will review and discuss key issues related to measurement development such as item/scale development, number of factors to retain, rotation options and statistical programs. Prerequisite: Requires knowledge of elementary probability and statistics for non-statistics majors and BST 600.  Course will be graded by letter. 3 hours (Hendricks).
 
HB 714. Survey Research Methods. This course will provide students with a theoretical and practical overview of survey research methodology.  Topics to be covered include questionnaire and interview design; tailoring instruments for specific settings, populations and methods of administration; maximizing reliability of measurement; construction of scales and indices; sampling theory and methods, assessing sampling bias, and maximizing response rates. Course will be graded by letter. Prerequisites: Doctoral standing or Permission of Instructor. 3 hours.
 
HB 720. Neighborhood Influences on Health Behavior. To expose students to classical and current theories of neighborhoods and their affects on development and behavior in such a way that they will develop an appreciation for the importance of neighborhood context and its impact on development and behavior and the ability to critically evaluate studies of  neighborhoods and neighborhood context, and the conceptual tools to be able to incorporate neighborhood (and other) contextual effects into their own research. Course will be graded by letter. 3 hours.
 
HB 730. Health Communication Research. This course is designed to investigate the role of communication theories and research methods in promoting public health and preventing disease.  Theoretical background in communication and behavioral science, research methods appropriate for mass media campaigns and practical communication/intervention development methods will be addressed. Course will be graded by letter.  3 hours (Kohler).
 
HB 740. Advanced Program Evaluation. Advanced review of evaluation theories, approaches, and methods for assessing the plans, implementation, and effectiveness of health promotion programs. Course will be graded by letter. Prerequisite: HB 643 or other master's level evaluation course and a graduate level multiple regression or multivariate statistics course. 3 hours.
 
HB 750. Advanced Theoretical and Scientific Basis of Health Education and Promotion. Provides doctoral students with in-depth examination of history and philosophy of health education; reviews professional competencies and outlines major theories of behavior change. Course will be graded by letter. 3 hours. (Turner).
 
HB 760. Planning and Administration of Health Education and Promotion Programs. The purpose of this course is to teach and practice the three basic phases of comprehensive health education and promotion programs (planning, implementation and evaluation). Course will be graded by letter. 3 hours (Geiger).
 
HB 770. Doctoral Studies Seminar. The broad intent of the course is to review current issues relevant to the field of Health Promotion/Health Education, critically examine the relationship between scholarship, research, ethics and funding, and reflect and discuss theoretical aspects of Health Promotion/Health Education. Course will be graded by letter. Prerequisites: (Usdan).
 
HB 798. Doctoral Directed Research. Independent study with guidance of senior public health faculty. Course will be graded as Pass/No Pass. 1 - 9 hours.
 
HB 799. Dissertation Research. Research for dissertation under direction of dissertation committee.  Course will be graded as Pass/No Pass. Prerequisite:  Students must be admitted to candidacy in order to register for this class.1 - 9 hours.